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U.S. Claims Breakthrough with Rechargeable Alkaline Battery

Channel News (Australia), August 3, 2017

A Massachusetts start-up company today plans to unveil what it claims is a major breakthrough in battery design: technology that it claims can make solid-state alkaline batteries a viable alternative to lithium-ion and other high-energy storage technologies.

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Alkaline Batteries Make a Comeback as Safer, Cheaper Li-ion Alternative

Deccan Chronicle, August 4, 2017

Silicon Valley guru believes rechargeable alkaline batteries could be safer and cheaper to manufacture.

After the exploding batteries fiasco of the Galaxy Note 7 last year, the world had seen the dangers of the popular Lithium-ion batteries. A small imperfection could lead to catastrophic results due to the volatile ingredients of the Li-ion batteries. Therefore, researchers took to the drawing board to find a safer as well as cheaper alternative power source and they ended up in a technology from the early 2000’s — alkaline batteries.

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A Better, Safer Battery Could be Coming to a Laptop Near You

The Seattle Times, August 3, 2017 (syndicated from The New York Times)

SAN FRANCISCO — A startup company is trying to turbocharge a type of battery that has been a mainstay for simple devices like flashlights and toys, but until now has been ignored as an energy source for computers and electric cars.

Executives at Ionic Materials, in Woburn, Massachusetts, announced Thursday a design breakthrough that could make solid-state alkaline batteries a viable alternative to lithium-ion and other high-energy storage technologies.

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Tech Guru Bill Joy Unveils a Battery to Challenge Lithium-Ion

Bloomberg, August 3, 2017

Elon Musk isn’t the only visionary betting that the world will soon be reliant on batteries. Bill Joy, the Silicon Valley guru and Sun Microsystems Inc. co-founder, also envisions such dependence. He just thinks alkaline is a smarter way to go than lithium-ion.

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A Better, Safer Battery Could Be Coming to a Laptop Near You

New York Times, August 1, 2017

A start-up company is trying to turbocharge a type of battery that has been a mainstay for simple devices like flashlights and toys, but until now has been ignored as an energy source for computers and electric cars.

Executives at Ionic Materials, in Woburn, Mass., plan to announce on Thursday a design breakthrough that could make solid-state alkaline batteries a viable alternative to lithium-ion and other high-energy storage technologies.

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Long lasting battery made with Ionic Materials

Let’s Go Digital, June 30, 2017

By eliminating the toxic and flammable liquid electrolyte in current lithium-ion batteries, the company’s battery material is inherently safe and enables nonflammable batteries that will safely power the future.

Batteries made with Ionic Materials’ solid polymer electrolyte can be folded, cut and damaged without burning and they continue to perform. The removal of the liquid also results in a more recyclable battery.

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Sun’s Bill Joy is on a quest for a better battery

Axios, May 30, 2017

If you were to draw up a list of the most-needed technologies, a better battery would likely be near the top. Well, several years ago, then a partner at venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins, Bill Joy drew up just such a list and came to a similar conclusion.

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Batteries of the Future: A Local Company Working to Make Electronics Safer

Boston 25 News, May 11, 2017

WOBURN, Mass. – Cell phones, headphones and hoverboards have all caught fire in recent months because of their lithium ion batteries.
But a Woburn company has secretly been developing a safer battery for months, and is now ready to share it with the world.
They claim the battery is cheaper, lasts longer, and just may be a game changer.

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